In Older People, Housework Helps Memory And Prevents Falls

In older adults, physical activities are linked to increased brain volume and cognition. While there is plenty of evidence that recreational physical activity impacts brain health, the effects of other daily activities are less well understood. The links between household physical activity and brain health in older persons, in particular, are understudied.

Housework Helps Memory And Prevents Falls In Older People

The goal of this study was to see if there were any links between household physical activity, brain volume, and cognition in a group of cognitively healthy seniors. It is found after a detailed study by the team that normal household activities also play a vital role in keeping one healthy and maintaining physical balance, which is a challenging situation for older adults.

In Older People, Housework Helps Memory And Prevents Falls

Those who carry out household activities daily feel it easy to stand and balance the body compared to those with a sedentary lifestyle mentioned in the study.

In a group of cognitively healthy older persons, researchers looked at the links between household physical activity, brain volume, and cognition. These findings backed with the hypothesis that household physical activity is linked to increased brain volume, but there were no significant relationships with cognitive.

Grey matter volume, not white matter volume, drove the overall connection with brain volume. We believe this was reflected in the tendency toward a significant correlation with total brain volume, although after Bonferroni correction, this link failed to reach statistical significance.

The hippocampus and frontal lobe have been identified as brain areas that are particularly responsive to exercise, and our findings back up this theory when it comes to household physical activity. Surprisingly no links between leisure physical exercise and brain volume or cognition were discovered.

This is the first study to find a link between household physical activity and grey matter volume. It adds to a growing body of evidence that can help guide physical activity recommendations for seniors. Our research is the first to show a link between hitherto unstudied aspects of overall physical activity.

While there is plenty of evidence supporting the benefits of recreational physical activity, we now illustrate how a specific sort of activity that is ingrained in many people’s everyday lives affects their brain health? Highlighting the cognitive benefits of domestic duties (e.g. cooking, cleaning, and home maintenance) may encourage older persons to be more active by providing a more sustainable low-risk form of exercise.

Increases in brain volume are thought to result from improved fitness and increased blood flow after exercise. Total physical activity has been linked to improved cardiorespiratory fitness as well as a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and death. It’s been proposed that the vascular effects of unstructured daily activities are similar to those of low-intensity aerobic exercise.

We studied more general brain areas first but conducted an exploratory analysis to identify regional connections as this was the first study to look into the relationships between household physical activity and brain volume. Associations between the hippocampus and frontal lobe volume were found, which is consistent with the literature.

More research with bigger samples would provide more detailed characterizations of brain regions linked to household physical activity.

Aside from the flaws mentioned above, the study’s merits include objective measurements of cardiovascular risk, modern neuroimaging techniques, and distinct assessments of household and recreational physical activity.

Finally, the study found that household physical activities or routine works in a home increased brain volume, specifically total grey matter volume. This is the first study to show links between previously unstudied aspects of overall physical activity. It adds to the expanding body of evidence that provides physical activity guidelines for older persons.

United States trained Investigative Journalist, Clinical Pharmacist, PR Specialist, and Activist.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here